Dr Rogier Kievit

Fellow
Dept: 
MRC Unit
Research: 
Neurocognitive ageing; dynamics of psychological and neural changes across lifetime
Role: 
Tutor for Graduate Students

Dr Rogier Kievit

Dr Rogier Kievit

Profile

After studying psychology and some philosophy at the Universities of Amsterdam, Otago and Harvard, I started my PhD research at the University of Amsterdam. My graduate work centred around the development and application of statistical ­models that capture ideas about the relationship between the mind and the brain. During my PhD I had the opportunity to conduct research in Cambridge at the MRC-CBSU, working with Nikolaus Kriegeskorte and Professor Richard Henson on modeling in cognitive neuroscience. This period was so inspiring that I returned to Cambridge as a postdoctoral researcher, part of a Cambridge-wide research team called Cam-CAN. I use various psychometric techniques in order to better understand how changes in brain structure and function can explain why certain cognitive abilities decline with age, whereas others are preserved or even improve.


Research interests

My research focuses on the intersection of psychology, neuroscience and statistical modeling. As part of the Cambridge-wide Cam-CAN team focusing on neurocognitive ageing, I study the dynamics of psychological and neural changes across lifetime. I use techniques from network analysis and structural equation modeling to capture the evolving dynamics of ageing, and how reorganization and reallocation of neural systems allow for successful neurocognitive ageing.

News

  • 25 October 2017
    On 24 October, the University of Cambridge launched a campaign to promote zero tolerance of sexual misconduct.
  • 14 August 2017
    Research by Bye-Fellow Dr Rogier Kievit and colleagues proposes that different cognitive abilities such as reasoning and vocabulary help each other during development.
  • 23 September 2016
    Bye-Fellow Dr Rogier Kievit co-authors two papers on age-related differences in memory, and the mental and neural differences affecting fluid intelligence.
  • 18 December 2014
    Bye Fellow Dr Rogier Kievit, lead author of a new paper published in Nature Communications today, finds that different parts of the brain age at different rates.